In-Depth Post 5(Back dives)

I must say that I feel like I have improved a lot. I haven’t got a lot of dives in my suitcase full of tricks, but I have really got the ones I have been working on lock down.

For the De Bono section of this post, we were asked to transcribe a conversation. Unfortunately I did not transcribe a conversation with Ray, it’s hard because I am in a class with other kids, he doesn’t want to seem like he is giving me extra attention. But what I can do is use my experiences and previous conversations with Ray from all of my classes with him, I recognize some of the “Six Hats” that De Bono devises.

The first real conversation I had with Ray, we were both wearing the white hat. I approached him after class and told him that I was doing diving for a school project. He was very interested in the details of the project, the TALONS program, and my school. He asks little questions about the TALONS program almost every class, for example, why am I missing the class on May 16? I told him all about the Adventure Trip. I also am getting to know some things about, such as, Ray has been diving for 2 years and has swam all his life.

In all of that sports I participate in, and in school, I often push my limits. I am constantly asking Ray if I can try new things. He wears 000479_01the Black hat in conversations like these when letting me progress at a good speed, but has to contain me so I don’t push my limits too far. He has said before that once I get more experience with diving, then it is a lot easier to experiment with different dives.

Every class with Ray, I make it clear that I want to progress and learn. I am always eager to learn new dives and techniques, it is clear to him that I am always wearing the green hat. I am interested in new ideas and new ways of thinking, which is a big part of diving. Everything moves so quickly when diving so you need to think it through in your head before you dive. When Ray introduces new ways of thinking through the dive, it can help some and hinder others, it really depends on the person.

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This last class Ray introduced back dive fall-ins, which is a front dive fall-in but backwards.

These back dive fall-ins are much harder. Comparing to the front dive fall-ins, first of all, it is much harder to bend forward into a dive than to bend backwards. And secondly on a back dive fall-in, you can’t see where you’re going, so you have to use your special awareness to control your dive.

25 Sep 2000:  Ken Nee Yeoh of Malaysia in action during the Mens 3m Springboard Preliminaries at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre on Day 10 of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia.  Mandatory Credit: Al Bello /Allsport
25 Sep 2000: Ken Nee Yeoh of Malaysia in action during the Mens 3m Springboard Preliminaries at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre on Day 10 of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia. Mandatory Credit: Al Bello /Allsport

After getting a hang of the back dive fall-ins, I moved on to back dives. On a back dive, you stand on the end of the board with you back to the water. Then, you do your reach straight above your head. Next, you jump backwards off the board as if you are jumping onto a bed that is floating above the water. Lastly, you continue your rotation until you are up-side down, and complete the back dive.

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